Archive for October, 2009

The Universal Experience of Gratitude

Tuesday, October 20th, 2009

Researchers have found that when we think about someone or something we truly appreciate, and experience the feeling that goes with the thought, we trigger the parasympathetic or calming branch of the autonomic nervous system. With repetition, this pattern bestows a protective effect on the heart.

When you send out positive vibrations, you receive the same back from others. Showing gratitude passes positive energy from one person to another. It can positively affect someone’s day, week, or entire life. It also brings us happiness, which is healthy. Gratitude is a universal experience and has been a component of many religious traditions for centuries.

The Power of Giving

Wednesday, October 14th, 2009

There’s no denying that life in the twenty-first century is demanding. There never seems to be enough time to do all the things that need to be done: keep up with work or studies, spend time with family, earn enough money to pay the rent and buy necessities. With so many challenges to cope with, you may ask yourself, “Why should I expend any effort in giving?” or “I’m already scrambling to deal with all the demands and pressures on me. How will I find time and resources to give more?” or “No one gives to me, so why should I give to others?”

Forget Your Troubles – Enjoy Your Life Today

Tuesday, October 13th, 2009

Have you noticed that when you are totally stressed, you snap easily? You yell something without thinking… and then realize to your horror that you gave the perfect imitation of one of your parents.

If you grew up in a family that didn’t know how to cope with stress, then your gut reaction is to act the same way they did. When stress builds up, your best thinking takes a back seat. Childhood memory grabs the wheel.

It doesn’t matter that you vowed to be completely different from your parents when you grew up. When you are under duress, the old voices take over. You might even wince as you hear yourself using the exact phrase and tone that you hated as a child or teen.

Airing Out Your Compartments

Saturday, October 10th, 2009

If you think you hate your job, consider that the job may not be to blame. It may be that you’ve unwittingly taken the wrong approach to compartmentalization.

To become a professional in almost any field, it is usually necessary to compartmentalize – to separate one’s personal life from one’s work. A criminal lawyer can’t kick back with clients the way she would with friends. A CEO may call the employees of his company a “family” – but he would be a fool to relate to them in the same way he does his actual family.

While the need for distinguishing the personal from the professional is obvious enough, it’s also clear that compartmentalization can lead to dishonesty and dissociation from one’s true self. It can bring about a cognitive dissonance that separates oneself from one’s spirit.