Are You Aware of Subliminal Messages Controlling You?

Tuesday, January 19th, 2010

The word subliminal means below the perception of the conscious mind. Subliminal messages can be presented as visual, audio, or in the form of electromagnetic waves. The ultimate goal of any subliminal message is to manipulate a person by altering their perceptions to produce a change in thinking patterns resulting in modified behavior.

Some people may choose to modify their own behavior with self-help tapes which use subliminal messages to change negative behaviors or thinking patterns. On the other hand, subliminal messages can be used by others to alter a person’s behavior through a type of mind control. This may seem harmless enough, however, in the wrong hands these techniques can be used to control more than just purchasing choices.

Types of Subliminal Messages

One type of visual subliminal message consists of images with a logo, word, symbol or action depicted within it that eludes conscious perception. Another type of visual subliminal message contains stimuli repeatedly flashed across a screen at fractions of a second which is too fast for the brain to consciously perceive.

An Introduction to NLP – Neuro Linguistic Programming

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2009

NLP - What is Neuro Linguistic Programming?
Neuro Linguistic programming (usually shortened to NLP) is a method of high-speed psychotherapy. It relies on concepts of behavioral modification to treat a host of psychological problems, and has been successfully used on everything from mild social anxiety, to severe phobias.

NLP has also become popular as a way to optimize your personal performance. Many self help guru’s and personal life coaches incorporate elements of NLP into their systems. It can be used to make you more aggressive in business and more confident in your personal life. If you have a life-long hang-up, or some mental scar from a past experience, NLP has many tools that can help you overcome those kinds of challenges.

Multitasking Virus In Our Classrooms

Sunday, August 16th, 2009

A few weeks ago, I returned to the classroom of Dennis Dalton, the most important college professor of my life. From the back of an amphitheater seating several hundred students, I realized how much things had evolved at Columbia and Barnard. The lecture hall was now equipped with a wireless sound system, webcams, video projectors, wireless internet. Students were using computers to record the lecture and to take notes. Heads were buried in screens, the tap tap of hundreds of keyboards like rain on the roof.

On this afternoon, April 16, 2008, Dalton was describing the satyagraha of Mahatma Gandhi, building the discussion around the Amritsar massacre in 1919, when British colonial soldiers opened fire on 10,000 unarmed Indian men, women and children trapped in Jallianwala Bagh Garden.

How Body Maps in Your Brain Help You Do Everything Better

Thursday, May 21st, 2009

If you were asked, “Does your hand belong to you?” you would naturally say, “Of course.”

But ask neuroscientists the same question and they will turn the question back on you: How do you know it’s your own hand? In fact, how do you know that you have a body? What makes you think you own it? How do you know where your body begins and ends? How do you keep track of its position in space?

Try this little exercise: Imagine there is a straight line running down the middle of your body, dividing it into a left half and a right half. Using your right hand, pat different parts of your body on the right side – cheek, shoulder, hip, thigh, knee, foot. With your finger, trace a line over your right eyebrow and over the right portions of your upper and lower lips.