Life: Explained

Saturday, February 27th, 2010

A boat docked in a tiny Mexican village. An American tourist complimented the Mexican fisherman on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took him to catch them.

“Not very long,” answered the Mexican.

“But then, why didn’t you stay out longer and catch more?” asked the American.

The Mexican explained that his small catch was sufficient to meet his needs and those of his family.
The American asked, “But what do you do with the rest of your time?”

“I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, and take a siesta with my wife. In the evenings, I go into the village to see my friends, have a few drinks, play the guitar, and sing a few songs. I have a full life.”

How the World Became a Corporation and How to Take it Back

Friday, February 12th, 2010

Author Douglas Rushkoff’’s most recent work, Life, Inc.: How the World Became a Corporation and How to Take it Back, provides an interesting take on how society and the corporate world currently interact and more importantly, how the market forces have changed society for the worse.

Though the book makes some wild assumptions and at times provides little support for its positions, it does represent a comprehensive look at the ways society has changed over the last few decades. The corporate world has taken precedence according to Rushkoff’s work, and that’s push communities and individual relationships to the brink of disaster.

Profit Sharing – The Greatest Incentive of All

Monday, September 14th, 2009

I read a short article in an in-flight magazine years ago that ignited my career and changed my life. The small publishing company I had started was about three years old; we had no capital and we were losing money every month.

The article I happened to see was about a Swiss hotel that had been losing money as well. The building was run down and employee morale was low. The owners interviewed a potential new manager, and he said if he was hired for the job, he would implement this simple formula: one-third of the profits would be plowed back into the hotel for renovation, one-third would go to owners, and one-third to employees.

A Time of Great Permission

Tuesday, August 11th, 2009

Jobs are hard to come by, layoffs have been slower but still prevalent, industries are shrinking and disappearing and all that we have has lost a lot of its value. It’s been called a recession, it’s teetered on a depression, but what has failed to be mentioned is that it’s also a time a time of great permission.

When the rules change and the status quo is gravely interrupted, it is actually a time of great opportunity for those that are not too terrified (or paralyzed) to act on it. If we give ourselves permission to follow our own hearts and inner road maps instead of waiting for a new status quo to take root, we are looking at making new rules and shattering preconceptions about what can and can not be accomplished.