Lean And Green – Six Simple Strategies

Monday, August 3rd, 2009

We don’t often think of losing weight and becoming healthier as a way to live greener and become a better steward of the planet, but becoming lean and going green go hand-in-hand. Here are some easy ways to slim down, become healthier, and take better care of our beautiful planet.

1. Shop the perimeter of your grocery store where all the fresh, healthy food is located, like fruits, vegetables, seafood, and meats. The packaged, processed, and frozen foods that often contain trans fats, high fructose corn syrup, and other unhealthy additives are typically found in the center of the store. This could also be a money-saving strategy, since fresh foods typically cost less than processed foods.

Epigenetics – The Genie In Your Genes

Wednesday, May 6th, 2009

When a revolutionary new technique or therapy is described, it can take a while for science to catch up. Funding must be obtained to conduct studies. Studies must be performed, reviewed by committees of the researchers’ peers, critiqued, refined, and replicated.

This process takes years, and often decades. Much of the medical progress in the last fifty years has resulted from studies that build upon studies, from step by step incremental experimentation, with each step extending the reach of our knowledge a little bit further.

This evolutionary progress over the lifetimes of the last few generations has encouraged us to think that this is the way that science progresses. Yes, it is a way – but it is not the only way. There are scores of important medical procedures that were discovered years, or decades, or even centuries, before the experimental confirmation arrived to demonstrate the principles behind the treatment.

Are Humans Evolving Faster?

Friday, December 14th, 2007

Researchers discovered genetic evidence that human evolution is speeding up – and has not halted or proceeded at a constant rate, as had been thought – indicating that humans on different continents are becoming increasingly different.

“We used a new genomic technology to show that humans are evolving rapidly, and that the pace of change has accelerated a lot in the last 40,000 years, especially since the end of the Ice Age roughly 10,000 years ago,” says research team leader Henry Harpending, a distinguished professor of anthropology at the University of Utah.

Harpending says there are provocative implications from the study, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences: