The Key to Successful Relationships Part 1 of 2

Thursday, September 23rd, 2010

Every single person in your life is a mirror – knowing this is the key to all successful relationships. Others are simply reflecting parts of your own consciousness back to you, giving you an opportunity to really see yourself.

The qualities you most admire in others are your own and the same goes for those qualities you dislike. To change anything in your relationships, be the change you want to see – it is the only relationship advice you will ever need to transform your relationships into the joyful experience they are meant to be.

The Universal Experience of Gratitude

Tuesday, October 20th, 2009

Researchers have found that when we think about someone or something we truly appreciate, and experience the feeling that goes with the thought, we trigger the parasympathetic or calming branch of the autonomic nervous system. With repetition, this pattern bestows a protective effect on the heart.

When you send out positive vibrations, you receive the same back from others. Showing gratitude passes positive energy from one person to another. It can positively affect someone’s day, week, or entire life. It also brings us happiness, which is healthy. Gratitude is a universal experience and has been a component of many religious traditions for centuries.

Success Secrets – The Trap of Instant Gratification

Saturday, September 5th, 2009

It is true; you can manifest anything that you want. But history has shown us, when people win the 20 million dollar powerball, they often find themselves in the same position they were before they amassed the wealth. Getting anything you want instantly; be it a new job, a new car, a new client, comes with the same risks of winning the lottery tomorrow.

So what if your aspirations were a rigged slot machine that always supplied you with your desires instantly? What if you got everything you wanted tomorrow? What is the trap?

The Effects of Gratitude on Your State of Mind

Thursday, April 16th, 2009

Here are some reflections on what science has to say about gratitude, which has been called the “forgotten factor” in happiness research.

Psychologists Robert Emmons at the University of California at Davis, and Michael McCullough, at the University of Miami, are foremost researchers in field of gratitude. What they have learned so far is that gratitude is good for you, really good for you.

In an experimental comparison, people who kept gratitude journals on a weekly basis exercised more regularly, reported fewer physical symptoms, felt better about their lives as a whole, and were more optimistic about the upcoming week compared to those who recorded hassles or neutral life events (Emmons & McCullough, 2003). It doesn’t end there.