Stay On Top With These 6 Mental Faculties

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2010

No one will argue the fact that having full mental faculties is one hallmark of a successful person. Working on heightening and improving mental faculties greatly improves the chances of success in life, career, or any other endeavor one may pursue. When working on improving the mental faculties, the first obstacle is in defining what, exactly, these mental faculties are and how they work.

As with any complex structure (the mind being about as complex as it gets), it is best tackled by breaking it down into smaller components. Human mental faculty can be categorized into six major components: imagination, intuition, perception, memory, will, and reason. Defining and exploring these six components will lead to understanding how they improve our chances of achieving success.

Multitasking Virus In Our Classrooms

Sunday, August 16th, 2009

A few weeks ago, I returned to the classroom of Dennis Dalton, the most important college professor of my life. From the back of an amphitheater seating several hundred students, I realized how much things had evolved at Columbia and Barnard. The lecture hall was now equipped with a wireless sound system, webcams, video projectors, wireless internet. Students were using computers to record the lecture and to take notes. Heads were buried in screens, the tap tap of hundreds of keyboards like rain on the roof.

On this afternoon, April 16, 2008, Dalton was describing the satyagraha of Mahatma Gandhi, building the discussion around the Amritsar massacre in 1919, when British colonial soldiers opened fire on 10,000 unarmed Indian men, women and children trapped in Jallianwala Bagh Garden.

Five Wrong Questions to Ask

Sunday, June 7th, 2009

Marilee Adams’ second edition of her bestselling work explores further the concept of questions and knowing the right questions to ask at the right times. However, Some of the questions we all ask prove to be more detrimental than helpful.

Consider these five questions that you should avoid asking yourself at all times, even though they may still seem natural and familiar. All of these questions have built-in assumptions that can prevent the question asker from being successful or satisfied.

As you go through your day, listen to the questions you’re asking yourself and then wonder whether the inherent assumptions serve you. Sometimes you’ll find that you can be more successful and satisfied by changing your questions.

The Genius Machine – What is Thinking?

Sunday, May 10th, 2009

My work is to help people think. My clients write books, create innovative solutions, develop brilliant breakthroughs, and endeavor to make the world a better place.

During the last twenty years of working with business leaders to build their personal reputations, and to enhance the profile of their organizations, I created a system for developing intellectual property – ideas.

Not long ago a number of my clients turned the tables on me and suggested I take a little of my own medicine and organize my methodology. I eventually distilled my process down to eleven essential steps. I wrote a draft outline and circulated it among many of my clients, asking if it captured what they had found valuable. With their comments and further refinement, that system is what you now hold in your hands. I call it the Endleofon (END-leo-fahn), an old English word for “eleven.”