How to Retain Conscious Awareness of Prebirth Decisions

Friday, September 4th, 2009

Your life is supposed to feel good to you.  Before your birth, you knew that the primary component of your physical experience that would offer the greatest value for your personal and collective expansion and joy would be the component of the relationships that you would experience with each other. It was your plan to relish the diversity of your relationships and to choose from them the details that would make up your creations – and here you are.

Before your birth, as you were making the decision to focus yourself into this Leading Edge time-space reality, it was your powerful intention to enjoy every moment of the process. You understood then, from your Non-Physical perspective, that you are a creator and that you were coming into an environment with enormous potential for joyful, satisfying experiences in creation.

Would It Be All Right With You If Life Got Easier?

Tuesday, December 16th, 2008

Would it be all right with you if life got easier? I’ve asked tens of thousands of people that question over the past twenty years. After a pause, most of them say something like: “That’s obvious. Yes. Of course!”

Take a moment with that question. While you may find yourself giving an immediate “yes,” you could notice another question on your mind: “What’s the catch?”

There isn’t any catch. But this question about having life get easier flies in the face of what we normally consider the successful life to be. Many of us have learned that success is won by hard work – even struggle. We’ve raised the bar on our goals and achievements, while comparing ourselves to what we think others have accomplished. We get frustrated because we think we’re not doing enough to get ahead.

The Inspirational Life of Dr. Viktor Frankl

Saturday, July 26th, 2008

In order to begin to understand the extent to which his life and work stand today as symbols of strength and unwavering determination in the face of unimaginable suffering, one might first try, as much as it is possible, to imagine what life must have been like for Viktor Frankl living in Vienna in the months and weeks leading up to his internment in a Nazi concentration camp.

In 1942, at the age of thirty-seven, less than one year after being married, Frankl was granted a visa from the United States Consulate in Vienna. Emigration to the United States would allow the gifted doctor to escape the pervasive Anti-Semitism by which he was surrounded in his daily life as well as imminent imprisonment by the Gestapo. The visa, for which Frankl had waited years, also meant that he would be able to continue his very important psychiatric work in a relatively free and unabated intellectual environment.